Book review of: Margaretha Rossholm Lagerlöf, Fate, Glory, and Love in Early Modern Gallery Decoration: Visualizing Supreme Power (Ashgate, 2013), in: Renaissance Quarterly 68/1, Spring 2015, 259-261

Description
Book review of: Margaretha Rossholm Lagerlöf, Fate, Glory, and Love in Early Modern Gallery Decoration: Visualizing Supreme Power (Ashgate, 2013), in: Renaissance Quarterly 68/1, Spring 2015, 259-261

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 3
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information
Category:

Slides

Publish on:

Views: 9 | Pages: 3

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Tags
Transcript
  Margaretha Rossholm Lagerlöf. Fate, Glory, and Love in Early Modern Gallery Decoration: Visualizing Supreme Power  Fate, Glory, and Love in Early Modern Gallery Decoration: Visualizing Supreme Power byMargaretha Rossholm LagerlöfReview by: Jan L. De Jong Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 68, No. 1 (Spring 2015), pp. 259-261Published by: The University of Chicago Press  on behalf of the Renaissance Society of America Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/681333 . Accessed: 16/03/2015 16:23 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at  . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp  . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.  . The University of Chicago Press  and  Renaissance Society of America  are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize,preserve and extend access to  Renaissance Quarterly. http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded from 129.125.19.61 on Mon, 16 Mar 2015 16:23:23 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions  Fate, Glory, and Love in Early Modern Gallery Decoration: Visualizing Supreme Power  . Margaretha Rossholm Lagerl € of  .Farnham: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2013. xx  þ 276 pp. þ 12 color pls. $119.95. A gallery was an elongated hall meant for recreational purposes and increasingly used for the display of works of art; srcinating in the sixteenth century, one of the earliestexamples was the Galerie François I at Fontainebleau (1530 – 39). Although comparableto a colonnade, a porticus, or a loggia, it was unknown in antiquity. Consequently,indications for appropriate decorations cannot be found in classical sources such as Pliny or Vitruvius. Over the years, galleries would develop into rooms where the owner wouldshow his art collection. Thus they would take over (part of) the function of a receptionroom or   sala grande  .The decorations of four prominent galleries from the early sixteenth through thebeginning of the eighteenth century are the subject of Margaretha Rossholm Lagerl € of  ’ sstudy. In four separate chapters she discusses theGalerie François I at Fontainebleau, theGalleria in Palazzo Farnese in Rome, the Galerie des Glaces at Versailles, and the gallery of Karl XI in Stockholm. In the introductory chapter, Lagerl € of explains that she has 259 REVIEWS This content downloaded from 129.125.19.61 on Mon, 16 Mar 2015 16:23:23 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions  chosen these examples as  “ varied, rich, and  ‘ telling  ’  examples of visually manifestedexpressions of sovereign positions in the early modern societies they represent ”  (17).Each chapter starts with a description of the decoration and a helpful survey of essentialinformation, followed by an extensive interpretation. This leads to  “ impressions andobservations ”  used  “ in an instrumental and trained way to construct the hypotheticalcomprehensions and re 󿬂 ections of relevant viewers living in the circumstances thatmotivated the decorations ”  (18). In practice this means that Lagerl € of discovers  “  webs of allusions, ”  of which it is not always clear, however, whether they contain meanings that were srcinally intended or if these meanings srcinate from the author  ’ s personalnotions. For instance, in her longest chapter, on the Galleria Farnese, Lagerl € of comes toa totally di ff  erent reading of the fresco paintings than Clare Robertson does, whoseextensive recent study,  The Invention of Annibale Carracci   (2008), is totally ignored. While Robertson makes it clear, on the basis of a thorough study of documents,preparatory drawings, and circumstances, that Carracci ’ s paintings have nothing to do with the wedding of Duke Ranuccio Farnese and Margherita Aldobrandini, Lagerl € of considersthiseventanimportantfactorforagoodunderstandingofthedecorations.Her  web of allusions even leads to such interpretations as follows:  “ The most fundamentalanxietythematizedinthevaultdecoration seemstobethe ‘ sodomite ’ temptation ” (142).It is not easy to see how this would conform to Robertson ’ s well-argued conclusion thattheappearanceofthepaintingssprungmainlyfromartisticconsiderationsandthechoiceof subjects was based on a quite open program. A web of allusions is also Lagerl € of  ’ s clue for reading the decorations of the GalerieFrançois I. Trying to unravel the intentions of the paintings and stuccos that Francis Icommissioned from Rosso and Primaticcio is admittedly di ffi cult, as some of the scenescannot even be identi 󿬁 ed with certainty. Supposedly, not even the king  ’ s own sister,Marguerite d ’  Angoul ^ eme, could  󿬁 gure them out. Yet the way Lagerl € of discusses themseemstorevealmoreaboutmoderninterpretersthanaboutthe(possible)meaningofthedecorations:  “ The meaning structure is a web that is both thin and tight, with  ‘ knots ’ equal to hints at openings for inquisitiveness and brooding, but possibly capturing theminds of visitors to stay in the stories, sheltering the main  ‘ self  ’  of the decoration (theking), left alone, in the unrendered solitude protected by the veil of images ”  (237).Lagerl € ofdeservespraiseforbeingthe 󿬁 rsttostudygallerydecorationsasaseparategenredevelopingthroughtime,withafocuson “ theestablishmentoftraditions ” (18).Moreover,she o ff  ers clear and concise information on decorations of which there exist only a few comprehensivestudiesinEnglish,suchasthegalleriesofFontainebleauandVersailles,anddecorationsthatare relatively unknown (thegalleryofKarlXIinStockholm). Herreading of the decorations, however, abounds with notions and terminology that one would look unsuccessfully for in source material, and I consequently wonder if this study does not say moreaboutLagerl € of  ’ s own premisesand intereststhanitdoesaboutthe messagesthatthepatrons and makers intended to communicate. JAN L. DE JONG,  University of Groningen 260 RENAISSANCE QUARTERLY   VOLUME LXVIII, NO. 1 This content downloaded from 129.125.19.61 on Mon, 16 Mar 2015 16:23:23 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
Related Search
Similar documents
View more...
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks